All posts by curiouscat

Duoyishu Village, Yunnan, China

Duoyishu Village is in Yuanyang County, Yunnan, China. I took a private tour for my travels through Yunnan to make things easy on me (China and Kenya are the only places I have done this – because they are more difficult to travel by yourself than most places are).

Seated Man using a machine to make noodles

I took these photos on my visit to Duoyishu Village. I enjoyed my visit. I will post again with more photos from the many surrounding beautiful rice fields.

Blue Truck (motor not covered)

I think this is an interesting blue truck.

View of green rice fields from my guesthouse

View of green rice fields from my guesthouse in Duoyishu Village. The other photos are from close by, but some may be from a different village.

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Bayon Temple, Angkor, Cambodia

many carved faces with trees in the background

Bayon Temple is well know for the many (216 actually) smiling faces adorning the temple.

wide shot of Bayon Temple with tourists dwarfed by the size of the temple

I was living in Siem Reap for a few months and took these photos during a bike trip from the city to visit the temples. It is a nice bike ride (very flat the entire time). You can also rent tuk-tuks or taxis to tour the sites (I have done that also). I most enjoyed biking myself around. If I remember right it is between 12 and 20 km journey depending on what you decide to see and where start from in Siem Reap.

Tourists taking photos in front of many carvings of faces

Bayon temple was built in the late 12th or early 13th century as the official state temple of the Mahayana Buddhist King Jayavarman VII.

bas-relief art carved on the stone walls of Bayon Temple

Bayon stands at the centre of Jayavarman’s capital, Angkor Thom. Following Jayavarman’s death, it was modified and augmented by later Hindu and Theravada Buddhist kings in accordance with their own religious preferences.

a wide view of the temple

This photo I took on a separate visit.

Bayon was the last state temple to be built at Angkor, and the only Angkorian state temple to be built primarily as a Mahayana Buddhist shrine dedicated to the Buddha, though a great number of minor and local deities were also encompassed as representatives of the various districts and cities of the realm.

Covered stone walkway with art relief on the walls at Bayon

Related: Bayon on WikipediaTa Prohm temple, AngkorAngkor WatNeak Poan Temple, Siem Reap, CambodiaBorobudur in Java, Indonesia (Buddhist temple built in the 9th century)

Guadalupe Peak Trail, Guadalupe Mountains National Park

Guadalupe Peak Trail with mountains in the background

The Guadalupe Peak Trail in Guadalupe Mountains National Park is a 8.4 mile round trip hike with an elevation gain of 2,930 feet (they estimate 6 to 8 hours).

Brown beetle with a green head

If you can identify this beetle (or the other insects in this post) please add a comment. See more of my photos that I need help identifying.

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Borobudur in Java, Indonesia

Borobudur is an amazing Buddhist temple built in the 9th century. This is a site that can’t be missed, spectacular. All photos in this post are by John Hunter.

tourists on the top of Borobudur

Six square platforms form the base of Borobudur and these are topped by three circular platforms. The temple is decorated with over 2,500 relief panels and 504 Buddha statues.

stone carvings on wall

The temple is surrounded by lush green forests and that greatly enhances the feeling of tranquility at Borobudur.

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Travel Jacket and More Clothing for the Digital Nomad

This jacket from ScottyeVest (MensWomens) is designed with a huge number of pockets to secure all your gadgets and accessories. Sure your phone, headphones, keys, passport but also your iPad, Macbook and power supply. The jacket offers 29 pockets specifically engineered to hold your items and make them easily accessible and usable (for example letting you swipe and use your phone while it remains in your pocket).

ScottyeVest offers many different tech ready clothing options including:
Men Travel Pants (9 pockets)
Men’s RFID Travel Vest (26 pockets)
Women’s Travel Vest (17 pockets)
Follow any of those links to see many more great options.

This is the type of clothing I would create for my travels if they hadn’t done it for me. The convenience and safety offered by these many options are essentially for convent travel with all your devices and important papers (passport, credit cards, etc.).

Related: My Early Experience as a Digital Nomad: Part Two (shorts)Thoughts on Security Risks while TravelingLeaving on a Jet PlaneMy Early Experience as a Digital Nomad: Part One, Technology

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Yunnan Nationalities Villages

People in Traditional Yunan Cloths

Yunnan Nationalities Villages is located on the east bank of Dianchi Lake in Kunming, Yunnan Province, China. All photos in this post are by John Hunter.

Inside traditional Yunan wooden house with open brick fireplace

The village covers 25 ethnic groups found in Yunnan with examples of traditional houses and guides dressed in traditional clothing. China has a total of 56 recognized ethnic groups. I don’t remember which houses and traditional clothing are which ethnic group (please comment if you have information to share).

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World War II Memorial, Washington DC

World War II Memorial with the Lincoln Memorial in the background

The World War II Memorial in Washington DC is between the Lincoln Memorial (the photo above shows looking toward it) and the Washington Monument (below) on The Mall.

World War II Memorial with the Washington Monument in the background

The memorial was opened on 29 May 2004. Many Smithsonian museums, the White House and the Capital are within easy walking distance of the memorial.

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Thoughts on Security Risks while Traveling (especially violence)

This is a reposting a response I made several years ago on Reddit on “defending yourself abroad.”

How to travel safely

Not getting drunk at bars likely proactively addresses a significant portion of issues.

Second, if you are coming from the USA or many other fairly high personal crime countries there are many places you are much safer while traveling. If you are coming from Japan, Singapore, Scandinavia you probably are much more likely to be the victim of crime than at home.

people on the street in Kuala Lumpr, Malaysia

Kuala Lumpr, Malaysia

If you are not drunk the most likely crime is theft, while not good, it is much better than being attacked in my opinion.

The biggest concern in a new environment is that you don’t pick up on the clues of danger that you would in your home environment. This means to be safe you are wise to try and develop the ability to be more skeptical and more attuned to what is going on around you. You may also be the target as you may be more visible, may be seen as rich, may be seen as a jerk (often being drunk helps boost this impression).

There is danger everywhere. But we often exaggerate the danger of new place (new to us). Being careful makes sense, but the dangers away from home are often statistically less though are unfamiliarity may lead us to be less aware and able to avoid situations we find in unfamiliar surroundings. Also, being on your own (instead of in a city with lots of friends that help keep you in line, give you protection in numbers in some situations…) can increase the risk to you, especially again in unfamiliar surroundings.

I doubt learning fighting skills makes much sense. Outside of drunken brawls most places are not that violet and if they are many times it is guns and such things (though most often that level of violence is aimed at other criminals or family and friends).

There is other violence (between people) of course and it is sad and something to avoid. I would be amazed if car and bus deaths (of travelers) and injury don’t exceed by a long way any person on person violence against travelers.

Related: Location Independent Living Can Be In Your Comfort Zone and a Good ExperienceMy Early Experience as a Digital Nomad: Part TwoCurious Cat Travel Maps

Kuang Si Waterfalls, Laos

Tat Kuang Si park is a wonderful spot for a hike.

amazing light blue colored pool of water

The water has an amazing blue color that seems almost fake in photos but is really the color of these photos. The blue is due to dissolved copper.

pedestrian bridge with blue water pool and waterfalls in the background

The Kuang Si waterfalls are about 30 km outside of Luang Prabang. You can rent a open back pickup for about $30 (really I forget I think it was about that amount though) for the trip or you can join a tour group (easy to arrange at many guest houses and travel agents all over Luang Prabang).

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